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17 April 2009

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Perfectly put, m'dear. I don't think I have ever experienced such bad service.You are kind not to have named and shamed the establishment. I certainly won't be recommending it. However, the rarebit was really good and the company excellent.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/a-good-idea-from--jeanpaul-sartre-1118208.html
I couldn't have put it better than Alain if I'd tried. Certainly not in so few words.

Amen to the company, M. We'll go somewhere different next time.

Rattling On: you are brilliant. As is the always wonderfully readable Alain de B. I hadn't expected to get an answer so quickly so thank you. And go straight to the top of the class.

Oh my...what both a walk down memory lane and a slap in the face to the current findings!

Ha, lunch at the Ivy...Mike and I were so fortunate to have had lunch there on our first trip to England, no reservations, just walked in about 11:30 am and without a fuss, they said, almost apologetically that the theatre crowd comes in about 1pm and if we didn't mind a bit of a rushed lunch (teehee) that they would love to show us to a table.

The showed us to a lovely table and we had the most enjoyable time. Special memories...

I hope you've printed a copy of your article and sent it along to the teashop!

I love that comment and will be adapting it in future, I'm quite sure: the rarebit as being quite "cheffy."
Sympathies about the long wait and unfriendly service -- sad to visit the ghost of an old favourite.

Good grief! You're right. They should learn manners and how to apologise and make recompense - but more to the point, they should do their jobs better in the first place.

There used to be a teashop of the type that yours used to be in an upper room in Colchester, where I went to school. It wasn't so much an afternoon tea that you bought there, it was an experience. I miss those places.

But now there is a new 'teashop' in the city here, called Harriet's. I have no idea if it's part of a chain, but if you find one near you, go and find it and give it a try. You are greeted at the door by friendly staff, and the waitresses wear black dresses with white aprons. Not only can you buy afternoon tea with cakes, but you can also buy what we used to call 'high tea'. Light fare, nicely cooked. It's always packed.

The difference these days is that you can buy packs of tea, cakes and honey on your way out. I don't mind that!

Here you go -

http://www.harrietscafetearooms.co.uk/framedhistory_and_intro.html

Teri - I was taken to The Ivy for my 50th birthday and loved every moment. (The food was rather wonderful too.)

Rita - haven't sent the post yet but give me time . . .

Materfamilias - yes, I think that M's comment will find any number of applications in the future.

Jay - now that sounds like a proper teashop; thanks for the link.

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Thought for life

  • The House of Breath, William Goyen
    We are the carriers of lives and legends - who knows the unseen frescoes on the private walls of the skull?

Thinking about . . .

  • Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus
    I too listen to music more and more. Throughout my life, music has stirred me more than any other art form, and now, in old age, I find myself listening to it almost every evening, usually alone, for hours at a time.
  • Julia Blackburn, Thin Paths
    I began writing because I liked to write things down. I learnt foreign languages because they seemed to enter my head by a process of osmosis.
  • Joan Bakewell, Stop the Clocks
    I live contentedly alone. It's better that way and I am often thoughtful about what has been and what might have been. There are many like me.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Oh to be reborn within the pages of a book.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Why is it that we lose the things we love, and things cavalier cling to us and will be the measure of our worth after we’re gone?
  • Judith Kerr, Observer Magazine, 22 November 2015
    I don't believe in God. I find it much easier to believe in ancestors. I like to imagine they are pointing us in the right direction.

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