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23 December 2009

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I do not think you are alone - Husband and I ignore the lengthy build-up to Christmas - we hate being brainwashed by the terrible consumerism. We love Christmas Eve and the day itself but we are glad to get back to normal!

We too are opting for a quiet Christmas. We've dispensed with traditional gift giving for various reasons (daughter's conversion to Judaism, airline tickets for long-distance son instead, a February trip to the Cayman's for me and my husband). And my recent blogposts have been few and far between and introspective to the point of "dark" according to my husband. Our word for 2010 is "adventure." And, I'm hoping to also feel a bit more "inspired." Cheers to all for the New Year!

Right there with you blog-wise, as you already know. As for the Christmas thing, we still seem to be the hub for our four adult children and their partners (and one grandchild), but this is shifting -- we'll bring dishes to Christmas Eve and Christmas dinner gatherings, but they'll be hosted by my daughters. Our place stays quiet and undecorated. What I've found with the years is that I can easily forecast what will be landfill fodder and I can't bring myself to contribute. Good company, good food, good music -- I'll do shopping in crowds for the right gifts and enjoy it, but I won't do make-do or obligation much anymore.
May you have a peaceful and satisfying Christmas Day and a rewarding end to the Old Year and time to contemplate the possibilities of the New one.

Sounds to me as if you have had a wonderful holiday already! Delighted to hear from you, and about your wonderful Venetian Christmas.

I'll be thinking of you when I go to watch the Red Shoes next week - one of the many cyber gifts you offered here and which inspired my curiosity.

Here's hoping you have a peaceful Christmastime and enjoy the fruits of your kitchen labour.

C

I'm sure we can all benefit from some decluttering (blogwise and otherwise). I'm relieved to read that you're not planning to close down 60goingon16 and look forward to visiting throughout 2010. However you celebrate, have a lovely Christmas and very best wishes for a happy and healthy new year.

Thank you all so much and a million good wishes bouncing back to you. Have just seen photos of Venice this Christmas and it's probably just as well I'm not there . . . http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_pictures/8429278.stm

I am delighted that you still intend to blog, it would be a serious loss to my ability to think if your thoughts were not there.

As for a ritual declutter, not too much please as this is part of the interest, the need to delve into corners of the site.

A very Happy Christmas and New Year to you and your correspondents, look forward to your postings, however few, in 2010

Re the xmas thing....maybe it is an age thing but as we get older different things take priority in our lives. I am bored by the overwhelming commercialism of xmas. So I, like yourself, had a most enjoyable laid back affair with people I love. Your "get together" with your friend of 50yrs touched my heart. I also spent precious time recently with my friend of 50yrs before losing her to cancer. For what it's worth, I enjoy your blog, and am often inspired to follow something up re books, music etc. Don't disappear completely, you will be missed. Sending you warm wishes from Oz for a healthy and happy 2010.

oh I just looked at the Hillside tape. Beautiful! Wish I was there. How about those highland cattle frolicking about like little lambs. If only everyone looked after their animals in that way.

A belated thank you to Bob and Fiona as well. I was very touched and encouraged by your comments and so sorry to hear about your friend, Fiona. A friendship of 50 years encompasses an enormous quantity of shared memories.

I have done some blog tidying; not too noticeable I hope, although there's a bit more to come. But I've been guided by the parts of the blog that people do visit - and those that they don't!

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Thought for life

  • The House of Breath, William Goyen
    We are the carriers of lives and legends - who knows the unseen frescoes on the private walls of the skull?

Thinking about . . .

  • Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus
    I too listen to music more and more. Throughout my life, music has stirred me more than any other art form, and now, in old age, I find myself listening to it almost every evening, usually alone, for hours at a time.
  • Julia Blackburn, Thin Paths
    I began writing because I liked to write things down. I learnt foreign languages because they seemed to enter my head by a process of osmosis.
  • Joan Bakewell, Stop the Clocks
    I live contentedly alone. It's better that way and I am often thoughtful about what has been and what might have been. There are many like me.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Oh to be reborn within the pages of a book.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Why is it that we lose the things we love, and things cavalier cling to us and will be the measure of our worth after we’re gone?
  • Judith Kerr, Observer Magazine, 22 November 2015
    I don't believe in God. I find it much easier to believe in ancestors. I like to imagine they are pointing us in the right direction.

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