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29 October 2011

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So beautiful! I never look to see stars anymore, living here in Britain. Some years back we all gathered at a friend's house in Bellingham, Northumberland for a BBQ the day before the show and a fell race. Her manor house was right on the river and I wondered down away from the house for a while. Looking up, I fetched some of the others down to see what was for many of them their first sight of the Milky Way. I'm sorry to say I would feel less safe without the street lighting here in suburbia by the sea, but it does certainly come at a cost.

So true. I remember being awestruck with the big skies and fabulous starlight in West Penwith, Cornwall, when I moved there.

We camped out once in the desert in the Middle East to be able to catch the irises after the rain. Quite a different night sky and just as fascinating, of course.

I love that Don Vincent tribute to Van Gogh, lovely. We get reasonably dark nights here on our little island, although we're always fighting the small faction who want more lighting. Across the Strait, the city of Vancouver beams its cumulative brightness into the dark, probing the sky rather relentlessly. We're a small enough community here that I feel quite safe walking in the dark, relish it, actually, although I try to remember to carry a small flashlight in my pocket. It's such a different sensation to walking along a lit sidewalk. Thanks for this lovely post.

I love the sky and never stop looking for things in it. We have a lovely uncovered back deck and live 15 ks from the nearest town so do not get any interference from artificial lighting. I look up and see millions of stars. I see satellites, the space station occasionally, UFO's, planes, both huge and small, the RACQ Rescue helicopter, Wedge Tailed Eagles, sometimes 5 at a time, many types of birds and beautiful cloud formations and lastly, lightning... just beautiful and I am so grateful.

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Thought for life

  • The House of Breath, William Goyen
    We are the carriers of lives and legends - who knows the unseen frescoes on the private walls of the skull?

Thinking about . . .

  • Daniel Klein, Travels with Epicurus
    I too listen to music more and more. Throughout my life, music has stirred me more than any other art form, and now, in old age, I find myself listening to it almost every evening, usually alone, for hours at a time.
  • Julia Blackburn, Thin Paths
    I began writing because I liked to write things down. I learnt foreign languages because they seemed to enter my head by a process of osmosis.
  • Joan Bakewell, Stop the Clocks
    I live contentedly alone. It's better that way and I am often thoughtful about what has been and what might have been. There are many like me.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Oh to be reborn within the pages of a book.
  • Patti Smith, M Train
    Why is it that we lose the things we love, and things cavalier cling to us and will be the measure of our worth after we’re gone?
  • Judith Kerr, Observer Magazine, 22 November 2015
    I don't believe in God. I find it much easier to believe in ancestors. I like to imagine they are pointing us in the right direction.

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